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What to Do When You Don’t Trust Your Team

what to do when you don't trust -hero

Do you trust the people on your team? It’s an uncomfortable question to ask, because as good leaders, we work hard to create a supportive environment and earn the trust of the people who report to us. But what if you don’t trust them? Again, as a good leader, you’d have to be able to have an open and honest conversation with that direct report, with plenty of constructive feedback, to try to get that person to change their behavior, right? No, not always. The problem could be more about you.

In our executive coaching work, we’ve discovered some patterns when it comes to this problem– and almost always these patterns have more to do with the leader’s own perceptions of what’s going on than with the team’s actual behaviors. Here are the most common triggers of distrust, and what you can do to work through these issues on your team.

Mismatched Signals

One reason why you might feel uncomfortable, at a gut level, with one of your employees is because of mismatched signals. That gut feeling is driven by various factors and how each of us reacts to those. For example, when someone makes a warm personal disclosure, it often increases the feeling of trust—at least for some people. There are many, many such indicators; here’s a list of some of the most common:

• Personal disclosure. A warm sharing of personal feelings and experiences.
• Vulnerability. A willingness to share mistakes, doubts, fears.
• Loyalty. Demonstrating commitment to the organization and individual people.
• Inclusive. Including others for input or decision-making.
• Appreciative. Willing to acknowledge and praise other’s contributions.
• Open. Easily exploring new ideas and new approaches.
• Affinity. Having a good bit in common with someone else, sharing similar experiences and interests.

The problem is that the indicators that matter to one person may not matter to someone else. If one of your direct reports shows vulnerability in an attempt to built your trust it might work or it might leave you wondering why they have so many doubts and fears. They are trying to build trust but achieving the opposite. Equally, being inclusive by soliciting opinions can be seen by some as building trust, but for others it signals a lack of ideas or a lack of confidence.

It becomes hard to trust your team when the signals being sent are not the ones that matter to you. And of course the reverse holds—you will have a hard time getting the team to trust you if you send the wrong signals for them.

Crossed signals are a barrier and as a leader you can break down that barrier by your unique leadership style by learning to frame your team members’ actions in terms of what they intend, not your gut reaction to what they do. If you are not particularly comfortable with personal disclosures from your staff, step back and recognize, “This person is trying to build a closer relationship; it’s not my style but I respect what they are trying to do.”

Another way to get past mismatched signals is to be more transparent with your team. One new leader explained to his team that he did not share a lot of personal information—so they should know that if they asked him personal questions, he would probably just avoid answering them. His disclosure helped the team. While they still prefer to use personal information to build trust, at least they were not interpreting his lack of disclosure as a signal that he disliked them.

Mismatched working styles

Mismatched working style is another reason you may not trust your team. Suppose that as a leader you are more comfortable with the detail—you draw conclusions based on the detail, and you like to question the detail. People who have a similar style will have more affinity with you—they will be easier for you to trust. Now, suppose one of your team prefers to engage with you conceptually about a project that’s been entrusted to them. They’ll talk in terms of broad concepts and general principles. You need the details of what is going on. They are trying to show that they know what they are doing. Instead they are just being annoying.

For this kind of mismatch, reframing the person’s action in terms of good intention won’t help much. Again, transparency can help. Explain your preference, help the person understand what you want and why. If they know you want details not the overview (or vice versa) they are more likely to do what they need to earn your trust.

Unfortunately, it’s quite common for managers to work hard at dropping all kinds of hints about what is annoying them only to find that the person blithely carries on with no change. The trouble is that the hints, code words, and vague suggestions are just not understood. When you say, “You tend to be too conceptual in your presentations” it is not entirely clear to them what that means; they might not even clue into the fact that you are making a serious criticism. Even if they do clue in, they may have no idea what to do differently.

Here’s the solution. Feedback needs to be very specific and very behavioral if you want it to work. For example, instead of saying “You focus too much on the big picture” say “I want you to know the key numbers off the top of your head” or “I don’t want you telling me only the conclusion of your analysis, I want you to walk me through the spreadsheet line by line.” Instead of saying “You need to work on engaging stakeholders” say “I recommend you to fly to New York and take him to lunch.”

Critical Tasks

Another reason you may not trust one of your team members is because the work really matters to you, you are an expert, and you are just not sure anyone else can do it properly. You know you can do the work faster and more accurately. You may trust the team in some ways, just not their capability to do the work adequately.

The other end of this expertise spectrum is when the work really matters but you don’t have experience in the area and are anxious that you can’t assess their work. Their assurances that “everything’s on track” or “don’t worry, this kind of problem always happen” aren’t enough for you to trust the end result will be good enough.

How do you handle this lingering doubt that your people will deliver without making a futile attempt to micromanage every project? The key is to explicitly identify the factors and metrics that will tell you if the project is on track. For example, is the project hitting its milestones? If yes and you feel the milestones are well planned, then you can trust the team to continue. Or, does what your team tell you about the project jive with what other people in the organization are telling you? The metrics to track vary by project.

There is one additional tip for learning to trust that your team is on track. Sit in on one of your direct report’s team meetings. Is there a two-way discussion or does your employee’s team sit silently through a lecture? Good open communication is a powerful signal that the work is likely to be on track; lack of communication is a warning that your lack of trust may be well founded.

Most of us think about trust as a black and white decision. We trust you or we don’t. In business relationships, trust is rarely so clear cut. I may trust your expertise on a particular topic but not your judgment on hiring or communicating a message to my stakeholders. Rather than black or white, a better approach is to think of trust more like a barometer. Trust goes up and down depending on the circumstances, the task at hand, the political landscape, your sense of security on the issue, and the nature of the relationship. In this way, you think of how to increase trust not necessarily getting to 100% trust. Our natural tendency is to base trust on gut reactions and that’s not good enough to be an effective manager. It’s not that gut reactions don’t matter, but leaders need to be a lot more analytical in how they learn to trust their team. You can’t get rid of all the people whom you don’t fully trust, so you need to get better at identifying and fixing the things that stand in the way of trust

Source: Wanda T. Wallace, David Creelman

Lead by Example: 12 Ways to Be a Successful Team Leader

Over the years that I have worked in the project management field, I’ve taken a number of courses, read a number of books, and have seen and utilized a number of tools that have all promised success in leading teams and managing successful projects. And as helpful as they were, I found that the greatest asset in leading teams and managing projects is not found in technical tools and procedures but in skillfully relating to people. You can have all the processes and procedures memorized, have all the certifications, be an expert in all the technical tools, and list out all the terminology without skipping a beat. But if you can’t skillfully manage human relationships and interactions, you will fail in your attempt to successfully lead teams and manage successful projects.

If you’re not the greatest natural leader since Captain America, I’m here to help out. I’ve listed 10 guidelines to help you improve your ability to lead. If you can master these, you will exponentially increase your ability to lead teams and manage successful projects. Keep in mind that you won’t always get these skills right away. You’ll make mistakes. I know I do. But that’s ok as long as you keep working at it and resolve that no matter what, you’ll be a better leader. You need to do this because so few people are, and this world is starved for good leaders. So without further ado…

1) Don’t criticize or complain about people.

The surest way to demotivate people is to constantly criticize them or complain about them. If they make a mistake, put it in perspective with the things they constantly do well. Accentuate the positive and utilize mistakes as opportunities for continued improvement. This leads us to our next item…

2) Praise improvement, even minor improvements.

Psychologists discovered long ago that when you positively reinforce a desired behavior, people are far more likely to repeat that behavior. Most people want to do the right thing, which means you will find far more success in leading a team if you focus on using positive reinforcement rather than negative actions like threats and fear tactics.

3) Give honest and sincere praise and appreciation.

All people deeply desire significance. One of the easiest ways you can help fulfill desire that is by offering honest and sincere praise and appreciation whenever possible. This is probably one of the greatest motivational methods you can ever employ.

4) Encourage other people to talk and be a good active listener.

People want to be heard, really heard, and not patronized. Oftentimes, instead of listening to someone in a conversation, people are really just waiting for an opportunity to speak. If this is an area where you struggle, one trick is to say “What I understand you’re saying is…” By repeating what you understand the other person to be saying, it forces you to really listen to what they are saying. And as a side benefit, it reinforces to the speaker that you truly are listening to them and respect what they have to say.

5) Be genuinely interested in other people and make them feel important.

Everyone’s favorite primary subject is themselves, its human nature. Social media at large and the “selfie” testify to this fact. Nobody likes to feel ignored and unappreciated, including you (see item 3). So go ahead and make an effort to be interested in people and you will win their gratitude and by extension a cooperative attitude.

6) Be sensitive to people’s pride and let them save face.

The simple fact is that all people are prideful creatures. If you call them out on being wrong about something and make them look bad in front of others, they’ll fight you to the bitter end. But if you can offer criticism or disagreement in a manner that allows them to save face, they’ll be much more willing to cooperate and work with you.

7) Be respectful of other people’s ideas and opinions. Try to see things from their point of view.

When you try to understand another person’s point of view you may find that you learn something. But even if you don’t, you will still find it much easier to respect the people with whom you disagree.

8) If you are wrong, be honest and humble enough to admit it.

Sit down for a moment, are you ready for this? You are not perfect, you are not always right; you can and do make mistakes. One of the greatest personality traits you can develop is that of humility. We all make mistakes, and rather than deny and repeat those mistakes, wise people admit their failures and learn from experience. In doing this the wise person is able to grow and continually get better. If you’re honest and humble enough to own up to your mistake, apologize to those affected, and work to avoid repeating your mistake; you will gain the respect of those you work with.

9) Set a high bar for people and let them know you believe in their ability to succeed.

In 1980, the US Olympic Men’s Hockey Team was set to play against the Soviet Men’s Team in the Winter Olympics. At the time the Soviet team was the undisputed powerhouse in men’s hockey. Nobody expected the US team to have any chance of beating the Soviet Team. The US team was a mix of amateur and collegiate players and the Soviet Team had won the gold medal in six of the seven previous Olympic Games. Before the game, the US team coach Herb Brooks read his players a statement he had written out on a piece of paper, telling them that “You were born to be a player. You were meant to be here. This moment is yours.”(Coffey, 2005). The US team went on to beat the Soviet Team and then Finland and secure the Olympic Gold. Set a high bar for your people, believe in them, communicate that to them and be amazed at what they can achieve.

10) Set Clear Goals.

Goal setting theory teaches us that goals are the primary drivers of the intensity and persistence of effort. Both for you, and the team you intend to lead.

Very simply: assigning employees difficult goals results in higher performance than easy goals. Further, assigning employees specific goals results in higher performance than general goals (such as “do your best”).

Goals organize and direct our attention by necessity. They require us to regulate our efforts. They increase our persistence. And they encourage strategy and planning.

If you’re looking for a concrete way to put this into practice, look no further than the classic SMART Goal framework.

SMART Goals can help you lead a team to fantastic results

 

11) Understand Equity Theory and Practice Procedural Justice.

How do we move motivation beyond just financial incentives? How does fairness or unfairness influence your work environment? And what steps could we take to increase intrinsic motivation in ourselves and those around us?

Expectancy Theory from Victor Vroom simple illustration

There’s a lot going on in this diagram, which is why it’s still taught in a lot of MBA classrooms.

Expectancy theory from Victor Vroom suggests that if you can:

  • Set your team’s understanding about what is expected of them
  • Set what the rewards will be for meeting or exceeding that expectation and deliver those rewards
  • Offer incentives that they truly value…

You will dramatically increase satisfaction and both individual and team performance. Failing to live up the expectations you’ve set, whether intentionally or unintentionally, can have major negative consequences to morale and future performance.

12) Follow the greatest leadership rule ever given (IMHO).

If you wish to be a great leader, make it your focus to serve those whom you would lead. There are a lot of people that want the power, prestige and pay that comes along with leadership positions, but few want to do what it takes to actually be a good and effective leader. Great leadership isn’t about bossing people around; it’s about inspiring and guiding people towards a common goal for everyone’s benefit. Build your team up, give them credit for their work, praise their efforts and reward them when they succeed. There is a saying that states “Be the change that you want to see”, we can adapt that to this discussion by saying “Be the leader that you would want to lead you”.

*Coffey, Wayne (2005). The Boys of Winter. New York: Crown Publishers.

Applying 21 Laws to the Five Levels of Leadership

21 Laws | 21 nguyên tắc

21 Laws refer to The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, one of John C Maxwell’s must-read leadership book. As you learn about the 5 levels of leadership, you probably wonder which laws to practice on each level. The truth is that every law can be practiced on every level. However, certain laws are best learned as you move up the 5 levels of leadership so the following table gives you a reference for your growth process.

How to apply 21 laws of leadership on each level?

1. POSITION (RIGHTS)

People follow you because they have to

Law No. 1 – The Law of the Lid: Leadership ability determines a person’s level of effectiveness. Every person has a lid on his or her leadership potential. The challenge we all face is growing and developing to our full leadership potential, thereby raising the lid on our actual leadership ability.

Law No. 3 – The Law of Process: Leadership develops daily, not in a day. A leadership position can be received in a day, but leadership development is a lifelong process. By embracing the Law of process, we understand that leadership appointment is only a starting point.

Law No. 4 – The Law of Navigation: Anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course. When you receive a leadership position, it’s wise to recognize how early you are in the leadership journey and how much you still have to learn.

2. PERMISSION (RELATIONSHIPS)

People follow you because they want to

Law No. 2 – The Law of Influence: The true measure of leadership is influence – Nothing more, nothing less. If you boil leadership down to its essence, it is influence. Leaders help people work together to accomplish goals that benefit everyone involved.

Law No. 5 – The Law of Addition: Leaders add value by serving others. Many times leaders begin their careers with selfish motives. To move up to Level 2, leaders need to practice the Law of Addition. They lead in order to help people and add value to them.

Law No. 6 – The Law of Solid Ground: Trust is the foundation of Leadership. You cannot influence people who don’t trust you. Trust is the glue that hold people together. Trust begins at Level 2 and it grows as you climb to the highest level.

Law No. 10 – The Law of Connection: Leaders touch a heart before they ask for a hand. Connecting is the having the ability to identify with and relate to people in such a way that increases your influence with them.

3. PRODUCTION (RESULTS)

People follow because of what you have done for the organization

Law No. 13 – The Law of the Picture: People do what people see. When people see results from their leaders, they know results are expected from them. Whenever results are an expectation, greater productivity happens.

Law No. 15 – The Law of Victory: Leaders find a way for the Team to win. Leaders at level 3 always find ways to win. And they do this on a regular basis, regardless of the odds, obstacles, or circumstances.

Law No. 16 – The Law of the Big Mo: Momentum is a leader’s best friend. Level 3 leadership is where momentum kicks in. Good results create momentum. Production creates a positive cycle that can continue to roll on and on.

Law No. 17 – The Law of Priorities: Leaders understand that activity is not necessarily accomplishment. It’s very easy for us to work hard all day every day, and still never get done the important things that make us and our team productive. So the key here is prioritizing.

4. PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT (REPRODUCTION)

People follow because of what you have done for them

Law No. 11 – The Law of the Inner Circle: Leaders’ potential is determined by those closest to them. If you are a leader with a big vision, you won’t be able to achieve it without a team of leaders – an inner circle. They help you achieve and are almost like an extended family.

Law No. 12 – The Law of Empowerment: Only secure leaders give power to others. You cannot reach Level 4 unless you are willing to empower people, promote them and release them to lead. This takes a strong sense of security and an abundance mind-set.

Law No. 14 – The Law of Buy-in: People buy into the leader, then the vision. Few things are more inspiring and energizing than leaders who seek to serve their people and see them rise up to their potential and become leaders themselves.

5. PINNACLE (RESPECT)

People follow because of who you are and what you represent

Law No. 20 – The Law of Explosive Growth: To add growth, lead followers – to multiply, lead leaders. Every time you develop a potential leader to Level 4, you change your organization for the better and increase its potential. The reason is when you develop a leader, you gain not only a leader but also all his or her followers.

Law No. 21 – The Law of Legacy: A Leaders’ lasting value is measured by succession. The goal in life is to create something that lives forever. The best way to do that as a Level 5 leader is to invest what you have in the lives of others.

Excerpt from “The 5 Levels of Leadershipby John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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Understanding the 5 Levels of Leadership

Too often when people think of their journey into leadership, they envision a career path. What they should be thinking about is their own leadership development! Good leadership isn’t about advancing yourself. It’s about advancing your team. The 5 levels of leadership provides clear steps for leadership growth. Lead people well and help members of your team to become effective leaders, and a most successful career path is almost guaranteed.

What are the 5 levels of leadership?

1. POSITION (RIGHTS)

People follow you because they have to

Position is the lowest level of leadership – the entry level. The only influence a positional leader has is that which comes with the job title. People follow because they have to. Positional leadership is based on the rights granted by the position and title. People make it to only Level 1 may be bosses but they are not leaders. They have subordinates rather than team members. They rely on rules, regulations, policies, and organization charts to control their people.

2. PERMISSION (RELATIONSHIPS)

People follow you because they want to

At this level, leadership is based entirely on relationships. When you like people and treat them like individuals who have value, you begin to develop influence with them. You develop trust by getting to know them and how to get along with them. At the same time, your followers find out who you are. You can like people without leading them but you cannot lead people well without liking them.

3. PRODUCTION (RESULTS)

People follow because of what you have done for the organization

Good leaders don’t just create a good working environment but get things done. That is why they move to Level 3 – which is based on results. At this level, leaders gain influence and credibility and many positive things begin to happen. Work gets done, morale improves, profits go up, turnover down and goals are achieved. Leaders can become change agents through making difficult decisions that will make a difference. They can take people to another level of effectiveness.

4. PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT (REPRODUCTION)

People follow because of what you have done for them

Leaders become great not because of their power but their ability to empower others. This is what leaders do on Level 4. They use their position, relationships, and productivity to invest in their followers and develop them until those followers become leaders. At this level, 2 things always happen. First, teamwork goes to a very high level because the high investment in people depends relationships and strengthens loyalty. Second, performance increases because there are more leaders on the team and they help to improve everybody’s performance.

5. PINNACLE (RESPECT)

People follow because of who you are and what you represent

This is the highest and most difficult level of leadership because it requires not only effort, skills, and intentionality and but also a high level of talent. What do leaders do on Level 5? They develop people to become Level 4 leaders. They create opportunities that other leaders don’t. They create legacy in what they do. Their leadership gains a positive reputation. As a result, Level 5 leaders often transcend their organization and sometimes even their industry.

Excerpt from “The 5 Levels of Leadershipby John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn

How do leaders save a broken relationship?

Relationship | Quan hệ

Good leaders are constantly cultivating and managing relationships with people at work. Anytime a relationship is strained, damaged or broken, they need to address the problem as quickly as possible. So how can you tell when a relationship has become broken? These are the most common signs:

It’s hard to have an honest conversation: When relationships are in trouble, it becomes difficult to have a normal, honest conversation. If we try to start one, the other person will refuse to engage, or become defensive or combative. They don’t want to hear from us nor talk it out. Maybe they have been so hurt that they can’t handle it.

There’s a lack of trust: When relationships begin to break down, suspicion creeps in. People begin to question our motives. Maybe they feel a sense of injustice or lack of fairness. Whatever trust was originally there begins to deteriorate.

There’s a lack of passion to continue the relationship: Eventually people stop putting in any effort to build back the relationship or to make it work. If we manage to get with them, they are mentally or emotionally withdrawn from us. Even if we’re with them, we’re not relating to them.

When seeing these signs, we should try to repair the relationship. That doesn’t mean trying to get it back at all costs, but to do it with integrity. Below are some of the steps to do it.

1. Initiate fixing the relationship with them: If we have a great relationship and it starts to get strained, it’s our responsibility as leaders to be the first to try to mend it. Invite the other person to lunch or coffee for a talk. That doesn’t mean it always pay off but it’s hard to rescue a relationship if we don’t take the responsibility for initiating.

2. Give them the benefit of the doubt: If there’s hope for helping a relationship come back, the conversation goes better if we’re open and willing to take the blame. Assume we’re on the wrong side by asking: “Have I offended you? Is there anything I can do to make amend?” If people are willing to talk to us what we did, there’s a chance to repair the relationship. Even if what we did wasn’t wrong, we should still apologize for what hurt them.

3. Be willing to walk the second mile: Leaders need to be quick to say “I’m sorry”. We need to be willing to make needed changes. That’s part of leadership. Nevertheless, we can’t always determine the outcome of the attempted reconciliation. There will be times when no matter how much effort we put in, the relationship is never the same as it was before. We should not be held hostage by that. We have to accept that, as leaders, we have the responsibility to be a good steward of our team or organization. We cannot allow our personal feelings of not wanting to hurt somebody keep us from doing what’s best for the organization.

There are many relationships worth saving, but many cannot be saved. We have to be realistic about the relationship and do our best. But sometimes we have to accept that it cannot be saved. We have to be secure in our leadership and give ourselves permission to have a different relationship from what we had before. We might still value the person, but we let them go.

Excerpt from “Good leaders ask great questions” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn

How can leaders inspire their team members?

If people see their work they are currently doing as nothing more than a job for a pay-check, they will become frustrated overtime. To be successful, to inspire, we need to keep growing, learning, and expanding our potential.

If the people in your team have settled into their role or position, whether it’s because they are in a comfort zone or because they see their work just as a job, it’s your job as a leader to inspire and help them open their eyes and think beyond today. Help them to realize that a job is never big enough for a human being. Offer them something beyond their job by doing the following:

1. Share your passion: If you have a passion for what you do, you need to share it with your people. A leader’s passion is contagious. It can attract other passionate people and it can spark a flame in people who might not otherwise be passionate. If they can understand and connect with the vision you have and the passion you feel, there is a good chance that they will catch it and become passionate too.

2. Paint a picture of a better future: People often want to make a difference. One of your job as a leader is to paint a picture of their future that inspires them to work harder today. Tell them who they can become. Show them what they could someday be doing. This must be done with integrity, because as leaders, we never want to manipulate people. We just want to help them envision the future.

3. Show how their role makes a difference: Too often people don’t understand how the tasks they do contribute to the bigger picture. Good leaders help team members understand their role. They help them see how their contribution is making a difference. This gives team members a sense of ownership over the mission, and inspires them to do better work.

4. Challenge them to keep growing: H Nelson Jackson said: “I do not believe you can do today’s job with yesterday’s methods and be in business tomorrow.” That’s why we need to help people see the value of growing. It is essential not only for the organization’s viability, but also for the individual’s future. People who make growth their goal – instead of title, position, salary, or other external target – always have a future.

All the above is only effective if, as a leader, you are yourself passionate about your own work. That is essential. People cannot catch fire from a leader who has grown cold. If you aren’t fired up, you are a big part of the problem, and the first person you must address is yourself.

Excerpt from “Good leaders ask great questions” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn

How do leaders motivate an unmotivated person?

Many leaders think that they can change people but that is not possible. People must change themselves. That doesn’t mean that leaders have no responsibility to people in their organizations in the area of motivation. It’s the leaders’ job to create an environment and culture where motivation is valued and rewarded. Below are ways to do that.

1. Start with motivated people: The best way to create a culture of motivation is to start with as many motivated people as you can. How can you identify motivated people? They usually have several of the following traits:

They exhibit a positive attitude

They can articulate specific goals for their life

They are initiators

They have a proven track record of success

And if you want people on your team to be motivated, you must be motivated yourself. People do what people see. We have to live it before expecting it from anyone else.

2. Understand the connection between relationships and motivation: people are motivated by leaders who connect with them and treat them like human beings. This might sound obvious but some leaders still miss it. Few things are more demotivating than working for someone who disrespect you.

3. Give each person a reputation to uphold: People often go father than they think they can go when someone else think they can. One way to show people that you believe in them and in the possibility of success for their future is to give them a reputation to uphold. Ask yourself what’s special, unique, and wonderful about each person on your team. All people have talents, skills, and positive traits that make them valuable to the team. Figure out what they are and share them with others. The more you validate people for the good things they do – or could do – the more they want to do them. Not only does this motivate them to perform in their strengths, it also encourages an environment where people say positive things about one another.

4. Reward what you want done: Most people will work for a reward they desire. If you want to create an environment where people are motivated, give them reasons to get things done. Rewards are motivating. Rules, consequences, and punishment don’t do anything to get people going. They merely keep people from doing their worst. If you want people’s best, give them incentives for performance.

Excerpt from “Good leaders ask great questions” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn

How do leaders resolve conflict and lead challenging people?

When you have difficulty  with people you lead, whether it’s because of a negative attitude, poor performance, lack of coorperation, or some other issues, you need to start a process to address the issue before things get worse. For the process to be successful, first you need to ask yourself two important questions: Can they change?  (This deal with their ability) and Will they change? (This deals with their attitude). The answer to the above questions has to be yes before you start the process. It can’t be either / or. If people are able and willing to change, you will increase the chance to be successful. Once you have confirmed the questions – go through the following:

1. Meet privately as soon as possible to discuss their behavior: If you have a problem with someone, do something about it as quickly as you can. Sit down with them and very clearly lay out what the issue is by giving specific, tangible examples of the undesirable actions or behaviors. Be sure to explain how their actions are negatively affecting the organization, the team, or you. Don’t be vague, use secondhand reports or attribute bad motives to them because they will only get defensive.

2. Ask for their side of the story: Peter Drucker observed: “Erroneous assumptions can be disastrous”. Sometimes circumstances such as a personal tragedy are temporarily prompting unwanted behaviors, and the person simply needs help or understanding. That’s why you don’t want to go in with the gun blazing because you might be wrong.

3. Try to come to a place of agreement: At this point, it’s time to find out if they agree with you. The ideal situation is for the person to admit “You’re right. This is the problem I have’’. But when they insist that it was not their problem, one strategy is to give them some time to think about it and then meet again to discuss. When you meet them again, if they have a change of heart and agree, you can move forward to the next step. If they still don’t agree, tell them: “You may not agree with what I’ve just said. But you still have to agree to change and follow my guidelines if you want to remain on the team. And I’m going to hold you accountable.”

4. Set out a future course of action with a deadline: Whether people agree with you or not, you must lay out a specific course of action for them to take. Once again, be very specific. Indicate any actions they must not take or behaviors they must not exhibit, starting immediately. If there are action steps they need to follow through, put deadlines on them. Make sure they understand. If you both don’t agree on what needs to happen in the future, you will both be frustrated.

5. Validate the value of the person and express your commitment to help: Before you finish the meeting, let them know that you care about them and genuinely desire a positive resolution to the situation. Tell them how you will help them. Sometimes the greatest value a leader can add to other people comes through telling them the truth, showing them where they can grow, and helping them change.

Sitting down with people and telling them where they fall short isn’t easy. And there is no guarantee that they will acknowledge their problem or change. There’s a strong chance that you will have to let them go. If you are having a hard time making that decision, ask yourself this question: “If I needed to hire new people, knowing what I know now, would I hire these individuals?

If the answer is yes – keep them

If the answer is no – let them go

If the answer is maybe – reevaluate in three months

After three months, if the answer is you don’t know, then let them go. Your emotions are making it difficult for you to accept a hard decision. But as a leader, you owe it to the team to make those tough choices.

Excerpt from “Good leaders ask great questions” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

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Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

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Email: info@eltd.com.vn

Best leaders know how to retain talents

We already explore the four types of leaders who cause employees to leave. However, the truth is, no matter how good we are as leaders, employees still leave. What we can do is to improve and put our effort in becoming a leader that employees always want to follow. The below actions and behaviors will more or less remind us to become a more effective leader.

1. Take responsibility to build strong relationship with employees: If something is causing the relationship to go bad, take the initiative to amend.

2. Perform exit interviews when employees quit: Similar to job interviews, exit interviews with leaving employees are to find the true reasons why they want to quit the job. If we are the reason, offer them our apology and ask them whether it is too late for them to change their mind.

3. Highly value employees: If employees trust us in the leadership role, that’s a good thing. But it will be better if we also truly believe in them.

4. Consider the trust of employees as the most important thing: Maybe we are not excellent in every aspect, but we must show for our employees to see that we are trustworthy in any situation, at any time.

5. Keep our spiritual health to create a harmonious work environment: Always try to maintain a positive mindset and right behaviors toward employees so that they feel safe to work with us.

6. Cultivate a learning and growing spirit: Keep on learning and growing your leadership ability. When we’re truly confident and mature, we’re no longer afraid that our subordinates will replace us. We will become the leverage for them to reach their full potential, not the rope that ties them down. Do not forget that the ultimate purpose of a great leader with influence is to add values to others.

One of the worst things that can happen for a company is losing its talents. If that happens, do not blame your competitors or employees or any other external factors. The first person to blame is the leaders. To help the company retain talents to achieve the goals and mission, the first thing we must do is to develop ourselves to become more effective leaders.

Adapted from “Leadership Gold” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

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ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn

Why people leave your company?

A survey shows that up to 65% of people quitting their jobs is because of the direct bosses. The employees themselves still love their jobs and the company still gives them benefits. But they leave because of bad relationship with their supervisors. In other words, they don’t leave jobs, but they leave leaders. These are the 4 types of leaders who will cause employees to leave.

(i) Leaders who undervalue employees: For the employees, nothing is more motivating to them than listening to the positive feedback or praises from their boss. For many leaders, criticism or blaming is easier to do than praise or commend. The reason is, in order to praise or commend, we must believe in the ability of our staff, then recognize their contributions – no matter how big or small. And to do this, we need certain time and effort. If not, our praises won’t be perceived as being authentic by our staff, and they will lose their meaning.

(ii) Leaders who are untrustworthy: Employees will never contribute their full capacity if they have to work with a boss that they don’t trust. A recent survey from Manchester Consultancy showed that these 5 behaviors or traits were the top reasons to cause the leaders to lose their trustworthiness.

Do not follow through with what they say

Care about personal gains rather than the benefits of the team

Withhold information

Lie or only tell part of the truth

Narrow-minded and conservative

(iii) Leaders who lack capacity: One of the number one complaints from employees is that they have to work with incapable leaders. These leaders will always cause the staff to lose direction and not be able to focus on the most important tasks. If the employees have strong experience or skills, they will worry that their leaders will mess things up, and if the employees themselves also lack experience and skills, they will not know what to do. In both cases, the leader’s lack of capacity leads to low efficiency, energy, and excitement.

(iv) Leaders who lack confidence: Even if leaders show respect toward employees, uphold integrity and capacity, the employees may still want to leave if the leaders lack one important character: confidence. Leaders who lack confidence have the tendency to thirst for power and praise from others, so they usually show worries, suspicions, lack of trust, or jealousy. In many cases, the lack of confidence shows less clearly – through the way the leaders see that fast-growing and highly capable employees are a threat. Because of that, they don’t want to develop and train employees to achieve full potential, and make themselves become “irreplaceable” so they can stay at the leadership positions as long as possible. Employees who work with such unconfident leaders are like eagles without wings; they cannot fly high and far. And one day, they will leave the company to find a new environment, with new leaders to help them reach their maximum potential.

Adapted from “Leadership Gold” by John C. Maxwell.

Visit www.ELTD.com.vn to know more about ELTD’s leadership  development and personal growth programs by John C. Maxwell.

ELTD-PNG

ELTD CO. LTD.

407/2 Su Van Hanh, Ward 12 – District 10 – HCMC

Tel: +848 3868 0687

Fax: +848 3863 2539

Website: www.ELTD.com.vn

Email: info@eltd.com.vn